Canadian Packaging

U.S. food industry feels effects of “Day without immigrants” protest – updated

Some segments of food industry reported a disruption of business, others not so much.


February 22, 2017
by Canadian Packaging staff

The protest “day without immigrants” that encouraged immigrants in the U.S. to not go into work on Thursday, February 16, 2017 was felt throughout the food industry.

Whether it was fewer people working at a meat processing plant, food concession chains and grocery stores closing the door for the day at Taco Bell, Sbarro’s and Starbucks, longer lines and delays at coffee shops, or restaurants voluntarily closing down for the day in support for the call to “inaction”, the point was made to protest against newly-elected U.S. president Donald Trump’s immigration policies.

The point of the one-day protest was to show the impact of immigrants on the U.S, economy, as even the absenteeism of immigrant babysitters would effect the ability of some family members being able to go to work.

The protest does present a blurring of the lines as to what it is really about—protesting about immigrants being needed to supply labor in the U.S. or illegal immigrants supplying labor in the U.S.

Other similar one-day protests are reportedly in the works in the U.S., including a similar day without immigrants protest on May 1, and one involving all women sometime in March.

Canadian food processors also felt the affects of the “day without immigrants” protest, with costly delays at the U.S. – Canada border, as well as a lack of product being shipped to Canadian processors causing havok all the way through to the customer who can not present enough product to the consumer unable to purchase what they want.

Regardless of who media wants to spin the results of the American protest, its effects were felt in Canada, which means it definitely was felt in the United States of America.

Image purchased via www.thinkstock.com.






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