Canadian Packaging

Making Light Of Stretchwrap Waste


June 28, 2010
by Canadian Packaging Staff

While strength and durability may be stretchwrap film’s two biggest virtues when it comes to securing loads of palletized shipments of boxes or other products, this essential functionality does not have to come at the price of a permanent environmental burden on the planet.

Recently developed by the Montreal-based Intertape Polymer Group (IPG), the new OXO-Biodegradable stretch film is a high-quality film, with comparable mechanical attributes to standard stretch films, containing a special additive that initiates and accelerates the breakdown of the film—but only when exposed to direct sunlight, which is very rare for most end-of-line packaging operations.

When kept out of direct sunlight, the used film is as recyclable as any other conventional stretchwrap, according to IPG, which produces a comprehensive range of specialty polyolefin, plastic and paper-based packaging products for a variety of retail and industrial applications, as well as woven and flexible intermediate bulk containers (FIBCs) and high-performance tapes and cloths.

But if recycling is not a readily-available option, for whatever reason, simply exposing the waste film to UV (ultraviolet) light and oxygen will set off a natural biodegradation process whereby the special OXO additives
begin to break down the molecular bonds in the remaining pieces—thus allowing live organisms to convert the pieces into carbon-dioxide and trace elements, completing the entire biodegradation process in less than a year’s time.

Distributed by the Woodbridge, Ont.-based Canpaco, the OXO-Biodegradable stretch film is available in standard clear construction as well as in green-tinted color, which allows users of this film to make their own clear statement on their company’s commitment to sustainable packaging and manufacturing practices.

For more information, contact Canpaco via www.canpaco.com.